CSIRO Edible Insect Symposium

CSIRO Edible Insect Symposium

Nicole was delighted to attend the CSIRO Edible Insect Symposium in Brisbane, Australia – developing Australia’s edible insect research and industry to improve environmental, health and cultural outcomes. It was great to be among like-minds and kindred spirits who all want insects to become a part of the Australian food supply and help grow the industry for the good of all. All the main Australian producers were there (with the notable exception of Skye from the Edible Bug Shop who couldn’t be with us but sent along some delicious insect snacks for us to enjoy). There was Grilo Protein, Leap Cricket Protein, Goterra, Rebel Food Tasmania and Grubs Up as well as Buggy Bix (insect treats for dogs). The presentations were very good and very diverse. We were honored with the presence of two international researchers, both big names in the edible insects world: Arnold van Huis from the Netherlands and Nanna Roos from Denmark. Nicole spoke on marketing, labelling and culinary directions. It was a diverse audience all the way from academic researchers, growers, marketers and little old us who provide nutrition marketing services to help insect businesses with great communications. Importantly the Insect Protein Association of Australia (IPAA) was there to offer a guiding hand to this emerging industry. Nicole is on the Food Committee of IPAA to help. We all agreed our fledgling industry is flying under the radar of government funding and support right now and we need to continue to make some noise about the amazing potential of the industry and encourage some government money to give us a hand-up. The passion and drive to succeed was palpable and there is no doubt edible insects are on the up in Australia.


The market panel:


Grilo Protein with Nicole


Nicole with Jess from Leap Cricket Protein


Nicole presenting on marketing, labelling and culinary directions

Nicole was delighted to attend the CSIRO Edible Insect Symposium in Brisbane, Australia – developing Australia’s edible insect research and industry to improve environmental, health and cultural outcomes. It was great to be among like-minds and kindred spirits who all want insects to become a part of the Australian food supply and help grow the industry for the good of all. All the main Australian producers were there (with the notable exception of Skye from the Edible Bug Shop who couldn’t be with us but sent along some delicious insect snacks for us to enjoy). There was Grilo Protein, Leap Cricket Protein, Goterra, Rebel Food Tasmania and Grubs Up as well as Buggy Bix (insect treats for dogs). The presentations were very good and very diverse. We were honored with the presence of two international researchers, both big names in the edible insects world: Arnold van Huis from the Netherlands and Nanna Roos from Denmark. Nicole spoke on marketing, labelling and culinary directions. It was a diverse audience all the way from academic researchers, growers, marketers and little old us who provide nutrition marketing services to help insect businesses with great communications. Importantly the Insect Protein Association of Australia (IPAA) was there to offer a guiding hand to this emerging industry. Nicole is on the Food Committee of IPAA to help. We all agreed our fledgling industry is flying under the radar of government funding and support right now and we need to continue to make some noise about the amazing potential of the industry and encourage some government money to give us a hand-up. The passion and drive to succeed was palpable and there is no doubt edible insects are on the up in Australia.

The market panel:

Grilo Protein with Nicole

Nicole with Jess from Leap Cricket Protein

Nicole presenting on marketing, labelling and culinary directions

Nicole was delighted to attend the CSIRO Edible Insect Symposium in Brisbane, Australia – developing Australia’s edible insect research and industry to improve environmental, health and cultural outcomes. It was great to be among like-minds and kindred spirits who all want insects to become a part of the Australian food supply and help grow the industry for the good of all. All the main Australian producers were there (with the notable exception of Skye from the Edible Bug Shop who couldn’t be with us but sent along some delicious insect snacks for us to enjoy). There was Grilo Protein, Leap Cricket Protein, Goterra, Rebel Food Tasmania and Grubs Up as well as Buggy Bix (insect treats for dogs). The presentations were very good and very diverse. We were honored with the presence of two international researchers, both big names in the edible insects world: Arnold van Huis from the Netherlands and Nanna Roos from Denmark. Nicole spoke on marketing, labelling and culinary directions. It was a diverse audience all the way from academic researchers, growers, marketers and little old us who provide nutrition marketing services to help insect businesses with great communications. Importantly the Insect Protein Association of Australia (IPAA) was there to offer a guiding hand to this emerging industry. Nicole is on the Food Committee of IPAA to help. We all agreed our fledgling industry is flying under the radar of government funding and support right now and we need to continue to make some noise about the amazing potential of the industry and encourage some government money to give us a hand-up. The passion and drive to succeed was palpable and there is no doubt edible insects are on the up in Australia.

The market panel:

Grilo Protein with Nicole

Nicole with Jess from Leap Cricket Protein

Nicole presenting on marketing, labelling and culinary directions

Insects as future food in Australia

Insects as future food in Australia

We love it when edible insects feature on mainstream media. Australia’s public broadcaster ABC TV have produced a series of programs examining the food we eat in Australia and how we can possibly manage the sustainability challenges of population growth and climate change while still maintaining a nutritious, diverse and delicious food supply.  By 2050 we will have another 15 million people to feed in Australia. The first program in the series  ‘Feeding Australia’ was titled Foods of Tomorrow. Among talk of modular farming without soil, barramundi farming and using avocado stem cells to speed up production, talk soon turned to eating bugs. Insects are a protein source that requires much less water, less food, less land and produce less greenhouse gases than beef. Co-host Dr Noby Leong invited a few of his friends around to try a few insect based dishes. Firstly, they tried bread made with cricket flour (check out our recipe for bread on our Recipes page), but they weren’t told there were crickets in it beforehand. They thought it tasted like rye bread and were very surprised to learn it contained crickets. This reinforces our own experiences of secreting insect ingredients into foods and offering it to our friends and family! We agree with Noby that people don’t mind eating insects if they don’t know about it and underlines the fact there is a ‘yuk factor’ in play in Australia. Next on the menu was mealworm tacos. While the flavour was OK, the fact the mealworms were whole was a visual turn off. Next, was a cricket stir fry with whole roasted crickets on the side. This was quite confronting with one of his guests saying “I can’t crunch the legs, the legs are just dancing in my mouth”. Again, this whole scenario matches up with our experience. We believe that in order for insects to become mainstream in Australia, we need to use them as ingredients in commonly eaten foods. This is happening overseas and will happen here too. And we’re here to help.

ABC TV is tackling the challenge of feeding Australia in the future, including insects